Classic Hollywood, Classic Whiteness by Daniel Bernardi

Classic Hollywood, Classic Whiteness by Daniel Bernardi

By Daniel Bernardi

Best students deal with the myriad ways that America's attitudes approximately race expert the construction of Hollywood motion pictures from the Nineteen Twenties during the Nineteen Sixties. From the predominantly white megastar process to segregated mise-en-sc?nes, Hollywood movies strengthened institutionalized racism. The individuals to this quantity study how assumptions approximately white superiority and coloured inferiority, and the politics of segregation and assimilation affected Hollywood's vintage interval. members: Eric Avila, UCLA; Aaron Baker, Arizona country U; Karla Rae Fuller, Columbia university; Andrew Gordon, U of Florida; Allison Graham, U of Memphis; Sarah Madsen Hardy, Bryn Mawr; Joanne Hershfield, U of North Carolina; Arthur Knight, William and Mary; Gina Marchetti, U of Maryland; Gary W. McDonough; Chandra Mukerji, UC, San Diego; Martin F. Norden, U of Massachusetts; Brian O'Neil, U of Southern Mississippi; Roberta E. Pearson, Cardiff U; Marguerite H. Rippy, Marymount U; Nicholas Sammond; Beretta E. Smith-Shomade, U of Arizona; Peter Stanfield, Southampton Institute; Kelly Thomas; Herman Vera, U of Florida; Karen Wallace, U of Wisconsin, Oshkosh; Thomas E. Wartenberg, Mount Holyoke; Cindy Hing-Yuk Wong, university of Staten Island, CUNY; Geoffrey White, U of Hawai'i; and Jane Yi. Daniel Bernardi is assistant professor within the division of Media Arts on the college of Arizona.

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Classic Hollywood, Classic Whiteness

Best students deal with the myriad ways that America's attitudes approximately race knowledgeable the creation of Hollywood motion pictures from the Nineteen Twenties during the Nineteen Sixties. From the predominantly white megastar method to segregated mise-en-sc? nes, Hollywood movies strengthened institutionalized racism. The participants to this quantity research how assumptions approximately white superiority and coloured inferiority, and the politics of segregation and assimilation affected Hollywood's vintage interval.

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With Driftwood acting as their representative, the imposters are greeted by the mayor of New York and whisked off to a parade in their honor. Upon arriving at the reviewing stand, they are asked to speak about their exploits as aviators. Fiorello addresses the crowd first: FIORELLO: What’ll I say? DRIFTWOOD: Tell ’em you’re not here. FIORELLO: What if they don’t believe me? DRIFTWOOD: They’ll believe you when you start talking. FIORELLO: Friends . . DRIFTWOOD: Talk fast. I see a man in the crowd with a rope .

39 While it is understandable that critics would have been disturbed by a comic presentation of a war still being waged, it also seems clear that Lubitsch was being disciplined for violating the classical conventions for which he had been imported and for “WHAT YOU ARE . . 2. To Be Or Not to Be (1942). calling attention to their subversion at the moment when their purported point of origin was collapsing. By 1942, being “European” no longer meant passing into a whiteness marked by class and culture.

DRIFTWOOD: Tell ’em you’re not here. FIORELLO: What if they don’t believe me? DRIFTWOOD: They’ll believe you when you start talking. FIORELLO: Friends . . DRIFTWOOD: Talk fast. I see a man in the crowd with a rope . . FIORELLO: How we came to America is a great story, but I don’t tell that . . He, of course, cannot tell that story. In a scene that recalls the opening dialogue between Groucho and Dumont, Driftwood questions Fiorello’s existence, and, in a sense, the nature of passing. He suggests that Fiorello tell the truth: the European aviator never arrived, but the immigrant did.

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